Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Carcass interview from 1990

This Carcass interview comes care of long time pen pal and all around rager Luc from France. Many people know Luc from his various bands such as Face Up To It! and Gasmask Terrör as well as running the label Ratbone Records. But in the late '80s through 1990, he also edited a zine under the name of Poulets Basquaise which featured interviews with Carcass, Entombed, Carnage, Benediction, Agathocles, Funebre, Paradise Lost, Immolation, Pungent Stench, Grave and more. An interview was also sent out to Mick Harris of Napalm Death upon the release of "Scum," but Luc said he forgot to include an IRC and therefore never received a reply. Too bad.

As Luc states,
Poulets Basquaise "was a balance of hardcore, punk and thrash metal. I was super young (13-15) and it shows. By issue 4 I had gotten super into the emerging underground death metal scene." The youthful naivete is evident, but there's a sincerity too that's obvious, and that's what makes it all worthwhile.

Luc was kind enough to scan in the Carcass interview from issue #4 (1990) and allow me to post it up. It's a short and interesting two page read. No, it's not the most in depth, but it's still interesting to read where the members of Carcass' heads were at shortly after their "Symphonies Of Sickness" album had come out in 1989.

It should also be noted how much better generic zine layouts of the era look back then than what passes for 'good' zine layouts now. Quite a disparity really in terms of how 'average' quality back then would be considered great today. If there's any 15 year olds writing zines today, they'd be hard pressed to put out something this good looking.






Wednesday, April 16, 2014

April 2014 distro update

Hello folks,
Apologies for sending out another distro update so soon after the last. As eluded to last time, I was very fortunate to be able to import stock copies of some cool later '80s and early '90s UK releases in from the Apostles and Oi Polloi. All of the records listed here are stock copies of the original versions that are unplayed, not recent represses. Please be aware that some copies do smell a bit musty and show varying degrees of shelf wear. If anyone has any questions, feel free to get in touch. Also, if there's any distros, stores, or just local sellers out there interested, i can do wholesale for The Apostles "The Acts Of The Apostles In The Theatre Of Fear" LP. Minimum of 5 copies please, get in touch. Thanks.

Full distro list and website can be viewed at http://www.socialnapalm.com/ .  Past email updates can be viewed at http://penetration82.blogspot.com/ .

If you'd like to be removed from this list, just reply saying so. I apologize for any inconvenience.

Please remember that PRICES ARE *NOT* POSTAGE PAID.

All parcels are sent Media Mail within the US unless you request otherwise. If you're willing to pay for it, I can send First Class, Priority, etc. with any number of services such as Delivery Confirmation, Insurance, Registered Mail, or others. Please email me how you'd like it shipped, and i can get you a total.

International customers please get in touch for rates. All international orders are sent via airmail. Get in touch for other potential shipping methods and services.

We can accept well concealed cash or *postal* (that you get from the post office) money orders made out to "Erik" (NOT Social Napalm). Thanks.

Paypal is accepted, but i do have to charge to include for their fees.

Address is at the end of this email.

Here's what's in stock now:

The Apostles - "The Acts Of The Apostles In The Theatre Of Fear" LP on Acid Stings $12.50
Original stock copies of this 1988 anarcho punk release. For anyone unfamiliar with the Apostles, they were one of the most outspoken and true 'anarcho' bands of the entire peace punk era. Originally formed in 1980, The Apostles were true anarchists in the most sincere form of the word. They were beholden to no scene, rejected the uniformity and rigidity of the confines of punk, and were extremely outspoken members of the community. Because of their true independence they won over many fans (including the members of Crass), yet also faced their share of detractors. For further information on the band, i recommend checking their biography on Wikipedia here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Apostles_%28band%29 or their Discogs page here: http://www.discogs.com/artist/Apostles%2C+The+%283%29
With that said, this LP was originally released on the Acid Stings label (Astronauts, Hellbastard). While this LP didn't come out until 1988, the vast majority of the songs were written during the earlier period of the band between 1980-1983. The remaining songs were written in 1985 and 1986. Due to this fact, the band considered this album to be their third proper album chronologically despite the fact that it was released after their fifth LP. With that said, the music is as high a quality and lyrically vicious as the best Apostles material. The Apostles truly were not afraid to take on any topics, and that's firmly on display here with a song entitled "Fucking Queer" from a period long before homosexuality and gay rights became an accepted progressive cause. The layout to the LP is fantastic as well with complete thought provoking lyrics, interesting and detailed artwork (and comics!), and an overall feeling that a fucking ton of thought and effort went into this release. This is the type of thing Andy Martin and the Apostles were known for, and i think this release is a quality anarcho punk album that still holds up very well.

Oi Polloi - "In Defence Of Our Earth" LP on Words Of Warning $15.00
Original 1990 pressing on Words Of Warning label imported from the UK. Recorded in January of 1990 at Pier House Studios, Edingburgh, Scotland. This release has Oi Polloi with a HC meets Oi sound and progressive lyrics for environmentalism and animal rights and against fascism.

Wretched - "La Tua Morte Non Aspetta" 12" on LoveHate80 $23.00
Official 2013 repress of this Italian raw political hardcore 12".
"How foolish I was! When one of my most beloved Hardcore bands released this 2nd 12" record, I didn’t like it at all. Not only I didn't – everybody said (and says) that this Mini-LP sounds "Metal" (which of course wouldn't be no crime), but that's bullshit. The difference from the band’s wilder days is obviously the higher production standard, best heard in the drum sound: In its dominance and with the reverb, it sounds almost a bit hardrockish, but that's it as far as the metal thing goes. Also, the strings were downtuned, but that only results in a fuller sound, not unlike that of later CCM. Apart from that, this mini-album is not too far off stylisticly of the legendary "Libero di vivere, Libero di morire" LP. So all in all, you have the same desparate gut feeling of italian Hardcore. Gianmario, the singer has a way to put words into singing, that’s really unique. What power comes through, even when he holds himself back!
Two first two songs are maybe the best here. Especially "Sezionati Vivi" (an anti-vivisection song), really haunts you with a gloomy guitar riffs, almost atonal, just what Wretched were always unbeaten in. The following "Verso il tuo Orizzonte" is a hectic thrash song, again spiced up by the use of some genre-untypical guitar bits. On the b-side, you get three more songs, of which "Vivere nell' Incubo" stands out, not only with its Amebix-esque intro part. All in all a really compact piece of work, ringing the bells of death for the fading Hardcore movement. Things had come to an end and this what this EP breathes."
-Erich, Good Bad Music For Bad, Bad Times blog


Other shit:

Dirge - "Right To Refuse: Complete Recordings 1983-1986" on Räw Wär Tapes
Real cool tape here released on a Russian(!!!) label of all things. Dirge was an old UK political hardcore punk band that, as the title suggests, existed from 1983 through 1986. Playing political hardcore punk along the lines of Anti-System, The Varukers, or a thrashier Mau Maus, Dirge are probably not the most well known band, but are still worthy of checking out. Many people might know Dirge from their LP that was released by Crust War in 2005. This tape features recordings that were not included on that LP including a live set recorded in Chesterfield in March of 1986 that saw the band moving in a more USHC influenced direction along the lines of DRI or United Mutation. This is a cool release that comes nicely packaged and is recommended for fans of 1980s raw UK hardcore punk. Gilb of Dirge went on to join the Varukers in the mid 1980s and currently plays in the Wankys. Officially released.

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

March 2014 distro update

Hello ladies and fellas,
Hope everyone has been well. Not a large update this time around, and it's already a bit outdated. Hope people might still find some things that interest them.

Regarding the distro, i'm trying to slim things down a bit. So i'm running a slight sale. All LPs are $3.00 off, 7"s are $1.50 off, and tapes are $1.00 off. Please email me direct with a list of what you'd like because the prices are not marked down in the webstore. Also, if something is listed as $X.50 round down the .50¢ before factoring in the discount. For example, a $12.50 LP = $9.00. If it's $12.00 to start with, it's still $9.00. Email with any questions.

On the label side of things, i know i'd begun to advertise some releases previously. Some things changed, and as of now the only release scheduled on the label is a Peacebreakers 7". These guys have just released their debut 7", and i really recommend it for fans of early '80s Boston and NYC hardcore. Negative Insight #2 featuring interviews with Chaos UK, Disorder, and Riot City Records will also be coming out this year. It will contain a 7" of two rare studio tracks from the early '80s as well. More info next time around.

The write up section of this email update contains an interview with Pete Giles. That's probably not a household name for most hardcore punk fans, but Pete was the bassist or guitarist in such bands as Unseen Terror, Azag-Thoth, Insight, Antichrist, Harmony As One, and others. With the exception of Unseen Terror, most of those bands are not the most well known either. But it's Pete's proximity and associations with the main players in bands such as Napalm Death, Heresy, Sacrilege, and many others is what makes his anecdotes and insight so interesting. And he was willing to recount them candidly, undiluted, and with complete honesty. If you were to draw a family tree of all the British bands 1985-1992 that all shared members, Pete would be all over it.

Starting in Antichrist, who were one of the absolute earliest extreme metal bands to come from England, Pete was involved right from the get go. Even though he doesn't play on their only recorded songs, two tracks on the "The Bailey Brothers Present Diminished Responsibility" compilation LP, Antichrist are both excellent and important for their contribution in ushering in the new era. Pete was also in Azag-Thoth who were another one of the earliest extreme metal bands from the UK, and are surely familiar to tape traders and fanatics of the time period. Azag-Thoth featured both Shane Embury and Wayne Aston from Warhammer (widely acknowledged as the first UK band to play death metal) while Shane was playing in Napalm Death at the same time.

After Azag-Thoth came to a close, Pete teamed up with Shane Embury again in Unseen Terror along with Mitch Dickinson (Antichrist, Sacrilege, Heresy, etc.). Mick Harris (Napalm Death, Doom, Extreme Noise Terror) also did time in Unseen Terror as well. In more recent years, Pete has played in Flyblown (who released a split 7" with Disclose from Japan) and Realities of War (a Discharge influenced band with one EP). Needless to say, Pete has a ton of anecdotal information to share, and his experiences documented in the interview below make for a great read.

This interview was conducted as a co-interview with my buddy Alan from the Glorious Times book and blog. His blog can be seen here: http://pioneeringglorioustimes.blogspot.com.au/ . If you haven't checked out the Glorious Times book, i can't recommend it highly enough. It documents what i would describe as the "tape trading and fanzine years" of the burgeoning international death metal scene -- basically 1985 through the early '90s. There's a wealth of excellent information contained within it, interesting first hand accounts, unpublished photos, and more than enough cross appeal and coverage of hardcore punk (Cryptic Slaughter, Massappeal, Napalm Death, Terrorain, Unseen Terror, and more) to make it a necessity to check out. So thanks to Alan for all his help!

Last thing, i've posted two interviews from my first zine that i did in the 1990s on my blog thing at http://penetration82.blogspot.com/ . One is an interview with Out Cold and the other is an interview with A Global Threat. Both are very superficial and with typical teenage punk questions representative of the era. But if you grew up during this time (looking at you Max, Doom, Quix, etc), then you now what it was like.

Full distro list and website can be viewed at http://www.socialnapalm.com/ .  Past email updates can be viewed at http://penetration82.blogspot.com/ .

If you'd like to be removed from this list, just reply saying so. I apologize for any inconvenience.

Please remember that PRICES ARE *NOT* POSTAGE PAID.

All parcels are sent Media Mail within the US unless you request otherwise. If you're willing to pay for it, I can send First Class, Priority, etc. with any number of services such as Delivery Confirmation, Insurance, Registered Mail, or others. Please email me how you'd like it shipped, and i can get you a total.

International customers please get in touch for rates. All international orders are sent via airmail. Get in touch for other potential shipping methods and services.

We can accept well concealed cash or *postal* (that you get from the post office) money orders made out to "Erik" (NOT Social Napalm). Thanks.

Paypal is accepted, but i do have to charge to include for their fees.

Address is at the end of this email.

Here's what's in stock now:

7"s:

E.A.T.E.R. - "Doomsday Troops" 7" on Loud Punk Records $5.00
"Loud Punk Records is proud to bring you the long over due reissue of one of the Holy Grail's of Swedish punk. In 1983 Ernst And The Edsholm Rebels released their first EP "Doomsday Troops" themselves and raised a quite a bit of interest worldwide, Though they recorded 2 other EP's this turned out to be their only release of the 80's before disbanding in 1989, Though in 2010 they reunited and since released the fantastic "If Nothing's Right..." EP. Over they years this has become one of the most collectible punk records to be released from the country of Sweden. You no long have to sell your station wagon in order to obtain a copy of this certified ripper. Remastered by Jack Control at Enormous Door Studios and sounding better then ever!" -Chris/Loud Punk Records

Formby Channel - "Saucy Seaside" 7" on Noise Punk Records $6.00
Second EP from this not very serious British act. "While the first 7" felt like (/was?) a collection of inside jokes taken to their farthest (and that's no complaint, the first 7" was amazing), this feels like a more fully-encapsulated mid-tempo rocking noise punk experience akin to hopping along a nude beach with a giant boner and a huge grin on your face. Stronger songs, stronger sound, more universal concept, more ukulele, and that layout......
If you are into noisy punk and plan on going to the beach anytime soon....I would HIGHLY recommend buying this record, making a tape of it, and just walking around the beach naked with this thing blasting on repeat through your ghetto blaster and singing along as obnoxiously as possible. Perfect soundtrack to your super happy fun time punk shenanigans. Everything about this record is fucking FUN." -Dan/SPHC

Merciless Game - "Genjitsu Wo Kutabare" 8" on SPHC $8.00
"Merciless Game is a project band started as a solo endeavor by one dedicated individual and currently featuring members of xBrainiax, Lotus Fucker, and Chaos Destroy. Negative and spiteful noise punk a la Dust Noise, Screaming Noise, Expose, etc. Primitive and brutal. This band is an interesting duality for me, because artistically it channels all my depression, alienation, and cynicism, while personally it represents a strong bond of friendship and respect to one of my best friends, who unfortunately lives 9 hours away from me.  Recorded in a few hours in December 2010 by noise scientist Mike Walls, sat on for a year so the world could prepare." -SPHC
Listen a little: http://soundcloud.com/sphc
OK, i'm not gonna bullshit here. I've had a long standing dislike of most things tagged 'noisepunk' since the subgenre saw a large boom in renewed popularity in the mid 2000s. With that said, i think Zach, who is the main song writer behind Merciless Game, does this project with an immense amount of attention to detail, sincerity, and focus to the nuances and characteristics that made the originators special. And that's what i respect about this record. There's just a ton of focus and care for authenticity in it. So if you're into bands like Dust Noise, Screaming Noise, Dislike, and similar acts, definitely check this out.

Noisecat - "雑音猫行進曲" 7" on Detonate Records $5.50
I don't know what to tell you guys about this record. I'm not into it. Noisepunk that sounds nothing like the Wankys to me or Chaos UK. Not my bag, and i don't want to be misleading. These guys come from Japan, and this record is out of print.

Wankys - "Poundland" 7" on Noise Punk Records $5.50
This is the 2012 EP by these Japanese noise makers containing ex-members of the Varukers, Extreme Noise Terror, and Dirge (what a fucking line up!). Noisy punk influenced by Japanese bands and a little bit of Disorder in there as well. UK import.

Zmiv - "Banzai! Here's Zmiv Beware" 7" $13.00
I've spent a lot of time lauding this band to just about anyone who would listen. HIGHLY recommended. From Holland, Zmiv originally self released this EP in 1982. This is what European thrash is all about to me. Combining various influences from the UK and US, Zmiv was able to write an incredibly catchy, urgent sounding, and intense debut EP with melodic touches and leads that make sure the songs stick in your head forever. I really can't recommend this record highly enough. Apologies for the high price, but it was an expensive European import. For more information, check out their page on Kill From The Heart here: http://www.killfromtheheart.com/bands.php?id=1472


LPs/12"s/10"s:

Active Minds/Satanic Malfunctions $14.00
"Limited edition European tour 12".  This is a one-sided LP featuring six new songs from each band, released for the recent European tour. Only 255 copies pressed, and there won't be any more. We still have a few left - get it quick if you want it. When they're gone, they're gone." -Bobs/Loony  Tunes Records
Interesting release here. Active Minds and Satanic Malfunctions are both two man bands that first formed in England in the mid 1980s. Previously, members of both bands had all played together in a band called SAS which released a raging 7" in 1985 called "Suave And Sophisticated". After that release, the members splintered off forming both Active Minds and Satanic Malfunctions. Active Minds continued through today with an excellent and extensive catalog of releases. However Satanic Malfunctions broke up around 1990, and these are their first new recordings since then. This LP was recorded by Bri from Doom at the 1in12 Club studio and released as a tour record for their 2013 European tour. There were only 255 copies made, and it is a one sided record with each band alternating songs. All in all, this is a cool release, and it's great to see new Satanic Malfunctions material after all this time.

AI - "The Sounds of Hearts" LP on Feral Ward $9.00
A nicely done LP here by Feral Ward that compiles the "Arming Rebellion With The Sounds Of Hearts" 7" (Bloodsucker Records, 1998) and the "A Hope On The Concrete" LP (Bloodsucker Records, 2000). Both of the original records have been out of print and unavailable for some time, and Feral Ward, as always, does a nice job with this release and making them available again. AI plays a style of hardcore similar to bands like Warhead, Nightmare, Death Side, and Crude.

Hard Skin - "On The Balls" LP on Feral Ward $13.00
One of the two Hard Skin LPs released in 2013. The best contemporary Oi! band going in my opinion. This one carries on with similar themes as passed releases: drinking, women, police, and class. Very well done, as always.

Meanwhile - "Reality Or Nothing" LP on Feral Ward $9.00
2008 LP. Formerly known as Dischange, after a line up change they switched the name to Meanwhile. Featuring members of No Security, Totalitär, Disfear, Krigshot, and a slew of others. Rampaging Discharge influenced Swedish hardcore.

Nightfall - "Fear" LP on Shogun Recordings $12.00
"Out of Philadelphia, Nightfall has already released two 7" back in 2006 (self-published) and 2010 (Fake Vomit / Diversity Recs) that set them ahead of their time, or at least originators of the Raw Punk spirit come back. You can hear their love for Japanese / Swedish Hardcore, but they also add their own brand of powerful noise to the mix. Recent bands like Mauser, Framtid and Desperat doesn’t sound so different. The new album contains 15 songs and the band will play it all over the East Coast soon." -Phil/Shogun Recordings
http://www.burnoutzine.net/distro/sons_shogun/Shogun53_Nightfall_3songs.mp3

Wankys - "Noise Punk Live Hero Swindle" LP on Noise Punk Records $14.00
This is the 2011 LP by these Japanese noise makers containing ex-members of the Varukers, Extreme Noise Terror, and Dirge (what a fucking line up!). Noisy punk influenced by Japanese bands and a little bit of Disorder in there as well. UK import.


Here's what should be in for the next update (DO NOT ORDER YET):

The Apostles - "The Acts Of The Apostles In The Theatre Of Fear" LP on Acid Stings $12.00
Original stock copies of this 1988 anarcho punk release. For anyone unfamiliar with the Apostles, they were one of the most outspoken and true 'anarcho' bands of the entire peace punk era. Originally formed in 1980, The Apostles were true anarchists in the most sincere form of the word. They were beholden to no scene, rejected the uniformity and rigidity of the confines of punk, and were extremely outspoken members of the community. Because of their true independence they won over many fans (including the members of Crass), yet also faced their share of detractors. For further information on the band, i recommend checking their biography on Wikipedia here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Apostles_%28band%29 or their Discogs page here: http://www.discogs.com/artist/Apostles%2C+The+%283%29
With that said, this LP was originally released on the Acid Stings label (Astronauts, Hellbastard). While this LP didn't come out until 1988, the vast majority of the songs were written during the earlier period of the band between 1980-1983. The remaining songs were written in 1985 and 1986. Due to this fact, the band considered this album to be their third proper album chronologically despite the fact that it was released after their fifth LP. With that said, the music is as high a quality and lyrically vicious as the best Apostles material. The Apostles truly were not afraid to take on any topics, and that's firmly on display here with a song entitled "Fucking Queer" from a period long before homosexuality and gay rights became an accepted progressive cause. The layout to the LP is fantastic as well with complete thought provoking lyrics, interesting and detailed artwork (and comics!), and an overall feeling that a fucking ton of thought and effort went into this release. This is the type of thing Andy Martin and the Apostles were known for, and i think this release is a quality anarcho punk album that still holds up very well.



Other shit:

Pete Giles interview conducted in July of 2013.

Social Napalm: Early on in your musical career, you played in the hardcore punk band Insight featuring a vocalist John, who had previously been in the anarcho band Hagar The Womb. Was this your first real band, and how did you come to be in it?
Pete Giles: No it wasn't, in fact Insight was only ever a side project for me because John at the time was also playing bass in Harmony as One. Harmony as One was my principle band having been formed in '89 with Martin Daniels on drums (who would go and play in both incarnations of Scalplock and Darren Livermore on bass (who also played in Long Cold Stare). And then before that my first band was Azag-Thoth, which Harmony as One came out of.

SN: You were involved with Antichrist who, along with Warhammer, are remembered as one of the earliest extreme metal bands from the UK. How did you end up jamming with Antichrist, and can you please explain who was in the line up and how it came to be? I've heard it featured members of AYS and Heresy? (Example: can you please talk also about the guy Jason on vocals who was thanked in the Slayer record?)
PG: Well I was friends with Jason, we were part of the same group of friends who hung out in London at weekends. For me at least Jason introduced me to some really crazy music at the time, most notable was Current 93. That blew my mind when I heard it. We used to cut up and sample tracks on our tape players and then send what we had done to each other, although that was slightly later, maybe '85. Anyway, it was mentioned he was going to rehearse with the drummer Rim from AYS and this French guy Carl who was going to play bass, and he asked me if I fancied trying out on guitar. Of course I wanted to do try out but could I actually play guitar? Had I ever been in a rehearsal room? Did I understand timing? Or did I even own a guitar at the time? Well to all these questions there's only one answer: NO!! Anyway I tried out but it was an absolute disaster, I simply couldn't play.  It was only later and totally unrelated to anything I was doing that Jason would enter Rich Bitch studio in '87 to record alongside Unseen Terror and Heresy a couple of tracks for the Bailey Brothers comp. That was the only time Jason recorded Antichrist properly from what I recall.

SN: Was there other Antichrist material recorded other than the two songs on "The Baily Brothers Present Diminished Responsibility" compilation LP?
PG: Not as far as I am aware.

SN: What happened to Antichrist after the comp songs were recorded?
PG: There was some talk of Earache doing a release but it came to nothing.

SN: Mitch was talking a couple years back about possibly pressing the Warhammer stuff to a limited edition vinyl, asking folks who'd buy it because that would determine if the project moved forward. Did you know about that, and if so, what ever happened to the project -- Mitch hasn't publicly mentioned it again.
PG: No, sorry, I am neither in contact with Mitch or knew about this announcement.

SN: How did Azag-Thoth come about? What was the original line up, and how did you meet Shane and Wayne? Did you know them through tape trading or something else?
PG: Azag-thoth was born in late '84 early '85. I bought my bass rig in '84 and wanted to do a band. I eventually roped in a couple of mates Rich on guitar and a drummer who I just don't remember the name of right now. The band existed as this across the summer of '85 and we recorded the "Death Creed" demo. Then as quickly as it had assembled it fell apart with the others, who weren't really into that kind of music anyway, leaving the band. Fast forward to '87 where I was still looking to find new members, when I saw an advert in Kerrang from Wayne saying he needed a bass player, while of course I needed a guitarist. So I phoned him up and said "Hey, I have this band I want to start again would you be interested?" and the rest as they say is history. Upon traveling up to Bridgenorth it wasn't long before I was introduced to Shane who had just started to rehearse with Napalm Death. Soon after first meeting he offered to help Wayne and myself out by drumming for Azag-Thoth.

SN: Azagthoth could have quite easily become more of a corner-stone band than people today realize, if you released something beyond the demos. Sort of like Majesty which until the internet and lots of back tracking most fans of L.A. grind and in particular Nausea and Terrorizer didn't even know were all three connected. What went wrong? Was it simply money, lack of a label, or members wanting to move on that was the reason Azagthoth never went that next step further?
PG: There are lots of reasons why it never happened for the band. First and foremost we were considered too extreme. I even have a letter from Metal Blade saying I don't think people are ready for this extreme kind of music, whereas Earache said it was too metal!!! Secondly, Shane's drumming is fuckin' atrocious, I don't think we would have been taken seriously because of it. Then there was the commitment issue, Shane was doing Napalm and Unseen Terror, and it came to be a bit of a competition between Unseen Terror and Azag-Thoth on who was going to write the fastest riff. Then  Wayne wasn't really into the kind of music we were playing, he wanted to play Manowar barbarian music which I wasn't into at all. Then there was the distance issue, I lived around 150 miles away from Shane and Wayne and consequently it was only a matter of time before I said bollox.

SN: There's next to nothing currently circulating from Azag-Thoth beyond the demos ("Death Creed" and "Shredded Flesh"), can't recall if any rehearsals made it onto the tape trading circuit in the 1980's - did you guys leak those rehearsals at all or are they stashed with some ex-member?...provided the tapes were even recorded that is.
PG: Shane may have a rehearsal tape, but I haven't found any. I thought I might have found  a rehearsal tape from '85 but it wouldn't play properly. So I doubt there is anything else out there.

SN: You mentioned previously that with Azag-Thoth you had interest from Motorhead's management. Can you please elaborate on this and what exactly transpired?
PG: Malcom Dome put them onto me, but once I sent them the demo I never heard from them again.

SN: After Azag-Thoth garnered so much interest, what were the circumstances causing the band to come to an end?
PG: Distance and commitment. At the same time while the band was in existence we didn't garner very much of anything.

SN:  How did you go from Azag-Thoth to starting Unseen Terror? Was Wayne Aston (Warhammer, Azag-Thoth) an original member of Unseen Terror, and why did he leave the band?
PG: I have kinda covered this above. So after I was in Unseen terror, Wayne started playing bass for them with Micky Harris singing.

SN: What was it like recording a session for John Peel, and can you please recount the experience? Was John Peel's radio show a big influence on you?
PG: That wasn't me, that was Wayne who did the John Peel session. I had been out of the band for a while by then.

SN: You're pictured on the Unseen Terror 12", but you didn't actually get to play on it. What is the story behind you not ending up on the record?
PG: Where I was working wouldn't give me the time off. I had been rehearsing hard for the recording but was still under prepared because of the short amount of time I had been in the band before the recording was scheduled.

SN: I've heard rumor of Mitch writing three new Unseen Terror tracks supposedly. Do you know if there's any truth to this, and were you involved at all? Would you consider reforming Unseen Terror?
PG: I do believe there is some new material that Mitch has written and I know that Shane and Mitch have spoken about going out and playing some live shows. However I was never involved in this discussion. I am after all nothing more than an incidental footnote when it comes to discussing Unseen Terror. I am 100% certain they wouldn't ask me to play with them especially since I am not in contact with either of them.

SN: What was it like being on Earache Records in the early days with bands like Carcass, Napalm Death, Heresy, and others. Did you feel an affinity with the others or an excitement about what was going on?
PG: I don't know if there was any affinity. Heresy hated Unseen Terror. Steve, their drummer, had  an Unseen Terror sticker on the toilet seat so he could piss on it every time he went for a piss. I loved Heresy more than any of the other bands, although I never actually got to see them but saw Napalm a number of times.

SN: When Unseen Terror came to an end, you reunited with old friend John from Insight to form Harmony As One and even had Mitch Dickinson try out. What is the story behind Harmony As One and how that band came to be, and how did it differ from your previous bands?
PG: No that's wrong, it was Darren Livermore who played bass first and then John came along a lot later. Harmony as One was a massive departure from Azag-Thoth in so many ways. I grew tired of singing gore-torture orientated songs, I wasn't listening to any death metal by the end of the band, my influences for starting HAO were straight edge bands like Straight Ahead and Unity, and Uniform Choice, and No for an Answer. Bands who had a social conscious. I was by now playing guitar and I wanted to play hardcore and had absolutely no interest in metal.

SN: With so many people from bands that you were involved with and traveling in your circle, did you ever try out or have any interest in being in Napalm Death? Was the opportunity ever presented to you?
PG: There was never an opportunity to try out, it would have been fun to have a go.

SN: Are you still in touch with Shane Embury, Wayne Aston, or Mitch Dickinson at this point?
PG: No.

SN: Having a hand in the formation of the extreme music scene in the UK (which was therefore part of the world-wide phenomenon) -- what do you think back to most fondly from that pioneering era?
PG: How exciting it was to hear new more extreme music. It was so vibrant and you never really knew what to expect next. Of course that couldn't last and by '88 most of the extreme music had already become quite derivative.

SN: Any particular bands, both home and abroad, which really spoke to you back then through their demos etc and encouraged you to keep doing things? Asking about the underground here, not the bands that had already gotten deals and had records out like the usuals Slayer/Kreator/Bathory etc etc etc.
PG: None that I can remember.

SN: In more recent years, you've been active in DIY bands Scalplock and Realities of War. Can you please discuss both bands and what they were about?
PG: Scalplock was the next logical step from Harmony as One. This was the most extreme band I ever did, politically and musically we really pushed at the boundaries. When Spread the Germs Over the Human Worms came out  it caused such outrage that it was called at the time  the modern version of the Sex Pistol's "God Save the Queen". We also had real difficulty getting it printed because of the political content. It went to 8 different printing presses before the label eventually found someone who would print it. Realities of War was nothing but a small side project that lasted a few months doing classic Swedish punk meets Discharge meets Flux of Pink Indians. We played a few shows and it was great fun but again there were commitment issues so that came to an end soon after we formed.

SN: Can you reflect at all on what it used to be like during that era compared to, say the last 20 years?
PG: Well it is difficult to reflect on this, but was it better? Well of course it was, because it was so fresh. It's incredibly difficult to push at the boundaries anymore. That would be the one thing that stays with me and the attendance at shows which was much better than it is now in our digital age where everything is available at a click of a button.

SN: Do you still try to weed through the bands today trying to find that diamond in the rough that can sock it to you...? It's so difficult because the volume of bands is extremely heavy now compared to the 1980's and the selection isn't noted for it's ingenuity....
PG: No I don't, I really have no interest in what bands are doing nowadays. I tend to listen to older music and I have no love for most of the shit that's out there now.

SN: What are you up to these days? Are you still actively involved in playing in any bands?
PG: Yes, I continue to play in a band with my wife, it’s a two piece band called Pombagira. Super heavy and psyched out progressively long songs that melt the mind. The extreme thing has remained with me since I now I tend to use 7-10 amps at once, downtune to A, use baritone strings and destroy people's hearing. With regards to other things I am now doing, I am now a writer for an American occult publisher.

Saturday, March 22, 2014

Out Cold interview from 1998

Like the previous post below, this Out Cold interview was also done for my teenage punk zine called Who Cares? fanzine (Issue #7). As noted in the A Global Threat interview below, I was 16 years old at the time and into UK punk and US HC. When I discovered that Out Cold were from the suburbs from Boston and living only 10 minutes away, I remember it blowing my teenage mind. How could these guys live so close and be this great, and I didn't even know them? Turns out the members of Out Cold were a lot older than me and had formed in the late '80s, put out a bunch of records, and been virtually ignored outside of Europe for most of their career to that point. But I LOVED this band from the moment I first heard them, and having them be so local only raised my interest in them.

I wrote them for an interview in the summer of 1998, if my memory serves correct. A few months went by, and i never heard anything back. Then one day, I came home from school and my mom said there was a weird message on my family's answering machine for me. I played it and heard "Hi, Erik, this is Mark from Out Cold calling you about that interview you sent to us a while back. Call me at [phone number], and we can schedule a time to do that if you're still interested." First off, my parents didn't know I did a zine. Like anybody who grew up as a teenage punk in the '90s, your parents thought punk was weird, so i always just found it best to keep everything a secret. The less they knew, the better. So how was I going to justify this? I don't remember. Secondly, I'd never conducted an in person interview in my life and was really not that assertive and was awkward as fuck. Nor did I have the means to tape record an interview. Still I called Mark back, and he must have realized I was very young by my voice. He said he hoped it was alright he'd left a message and said he'd gotten my number by looking it up in the phone book (back when people used phone books), and we managed to arrange a time to meet him at a bagel shop near his house in Dracut. I was so nervous. Scared to death is more like it. I remember I used an old answering machine found in my attic to record the interview on, and I still have the tape today. The interview went well enough, and Mark and a bit later on John (Out Cold drummer) became friendly with me. I really looked up to them, and they always treated me very well. A short time later, Mark called me again to ask me to conduct an interview for Out Cold that MRR had requested. I think I was 17 years old by that time, and I was being asked to interview my favorite local band for the mighty MRR. I thought I'd topped out in life. I'd peaked.

Mark Sheehan unfortunately passed away in 2010. It was very sad. He was always very kind to me, and I always appreciated how he treated me as a human being and not like some idiot when I was 16. But I think it showed the type of person he was deep down. When Mark passed, Out Cold effectively ended, although some material was released posthumously. So here is the interview. It's not great, but it does show some improvement over the A Global Threat interview below. Hope folks enjoy.







A Global Threat interview from 1998

In 1998, i was 16 years old and into bands like Aus-Rotten, Code 13, The Unseen, Toxic Narcotic, and a lot of stuff like that plus older UK82 and US HC bands. It was the times. I was young and enthusiastic and had a zine that was sort of about punk and sort of about BMX/skateboarding by the name of Who Cares? fanzine. By any measure, it was your typical teenage punk zine both in content and in execution. So it wasn't very good. But, back then, it was all about the youthful enthusiasm instead of the quality of content.

Anyway, this interview was conducted with Brett Threat of A Global Threat a short time after their first 7" came out. It was originally printed in issue #6 of my zine, which came out in either the spring or summer of 1998. This is when A Global Threat were still living in Maine and one of the "Maine Punx - Fuck You" bands. As evidenced by the questions, they also had a track on a Beer City Records CD compilation. The interview is not very thorough, but Brett Threat was kind enough to answer my superficial and trite questions seriously. He was kicked out of A Global Threat a short time after they relocated to Boston. I think I was at the last AGT show that he played in the band. I don't remember exactly where it was, but i think it might have been at the Elvis Room in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. I also think the Casualties were supposed to play that show, but of course they didn't show up (or were advertised on the flyer but never even contacted -- who knows). It was an odd time in punk. Sometimes i think back to those times and wonder where so many of the people that I knew back then are now. But like the name of the zine, really, Who Cares?

It should be noted that the first page of the interview here was printed out from the original Boston Punk website, haha. Also, I blanked out the second column on the last page because it was just poorly written reviews.




Thursday, February 20, 2014

Negative Insight zine #2 with Chaos UK 7" out this spring

The second issue of Negative Insight zine will be available in the spring of 2014. Titled the "Bristol Breakout" issue, it will focus on the deafening noise of the Bristol punk scene in the 1980s with comprehensive interviews with Chaos UK, Disorder, and Riot City Records founder Simon Edwards. The issue will feature many previously unpublished photos from the personal archives of band members and others involved in the era as well as a few surprises. The issue will also be accompanied by a Chaos UK 7" containing two rare studio tracks recorded in 1981 and 1983 and packaged in a Riot City inspired sleeve. More information coming soon.

Sunday, September 01, 2013

Punk DJ night - September 3, 2013


PUNK DJ NIGHT - Tuesday, September 3, 2013

DJs Zong Zolo and Ghost spinning the classics of punk, UK82, goth, Oi, minimal synth, and the New Wave of British Heavy Metal.

10:00 PM-2:00 AM
At the Ramrod on 1254 Boylston St., Boston, MA

Free pool, cheap booze, fast women.

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Wow.